Foods that Control Diabetes-Chromium

 

Have you ever heard about trace metals? We get a special trace metal from plants and animals called chromium, but only in small amounts, because we need only a little as too much can be toxic. However, the right dose of chromium can do wonders.

Trace metals are found in the soil and so this is where the plants get their daily dose of chromium. The animals then eat the plants and, yes, you guessed it, this is how they get their daily dose of chromium. Human beings eat both plants and animals, and so today we will investigate foods that control diabetes, with a special emphasis on those rich in chromium.

Chromium helps our blood glucose to be in the normal range and insulins’ effect  is enhanced by this mineral. It is, therefore, an important mineral for diabetics and those wanting to prevent this horrific lifestyle illness.

Thumbs Up

It is worth mentioning here that food processing, in many cases removes the chromium from whole foods. This gives eating whole foods the thumbs up. It has been pointed out a number of times on this website, that a diet rich in whole foods, can prevent and even reverse a number of “ill-desirables” such as: Thumbs up

  • Diabetes
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Obesity
  • Cancer
  • Arthritis
  • Inflammation in general

Chromium-Rich Foods, Including Herbs

Please see below for a list of foods and herbs that are rich in chromium.

  1. Broccoli and other fresh vegetables
  2. Green Bananas, corn, and potatoes
  3. Mushroom
  4. Brown Rice
  5. Whole Grains
  6. Meat
  7. Fish
  8. Dairy Products
  9. Yarrow
  10. Catnip
  11. Horsetail
  12. Red Clover
  13. Oat Straw
  14. Sarsaparilla
  15. Licorice
  16. Nettle

 Health Benefits of Chromium

Earlier I stated that the correct dose of chromium can do us wonders. Let us spend a little time to look at some of the health benefits of eating foods rich in chromium.

  • It helps to control the production of insulin.
  • Blood sugar is regulated by chromium.
  • Chromium increases our immunity.
  • Food cravings are regulated by chromium.
  • The way our body uses carbohydrate, proteins and fats are also regulated by this trace metal.
  • It helps to control cholesterol.
  • It assists with protein synthesis.
  • Memory loss can be prevented if we consume chromium.
  • Alzheimer’s can be slowed down with chromium.

Not Enough Chromium? The Verdict

Are you the reason your child has a learning disability? Your child has stopped growing or not developing at the pace he/she should, is food to be blamed? Is your diet the reason why you are depressed or anxious? Could you be diabetic-free?

When we continue to eat highly processed foods, which are completely depleted of chromium, here is what we have subscribed to and could get in the end:

  • Diabetes
  • The need for more insulin
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Neuropathy
  • Coronary blood vessel diseases
  • High cholesterol
  • Fatigue
  • DepressionDepressed man.
  • Anxiety
  • Nerve related issues
  • Mood swings
  • Learning disabilities
  • Bipolar disease
  • Hyperactivity
  • Irritability
  • Infertility
  • Reduction in sperm count
  • Obesity
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Stunted growth

Conclusion

Chromium is essential for diabetics as it helps to keep our blood glucose in the normal range. It is recommended for good health. It is better when we eat whole foods to receive our portion of chromium for the day. It’s worth noting that human beings need a little chromium, which goes a far way in keeping us healthy.

Our hearts will be happy we are eating foods rich in chromium. We will also ensure that depression, anxiety, learning disabilities, bipolar diseases, and others are kept at bay. The best way to get our chromium is by consuming broccoli, green bananas, mushrooms, meat, fish and other whole foods, including our vegetables.

 

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8 Comments


  1. // Reply

    Very informative post! I didn’t know the importance of chormium to our body and the it’s important heailth benefits. Keep up the good work!
    Your’s,
    Rebecca


  2. // Reply

    I like the long list of chromium and knowing what chromium is. There’s numerous ways of controlling diabetes and ways to avoid diabetes. My question to you is, why is catnip considered a candidate for chromium? Do we need to consume it?


  3. // Reply

    I didn’t know that chromium played such an important role in helping regulate blood glucose levels.
    I do try to eat lots of vegetables either by way of a salad or cooked veggies for dinner so I think I may be getting enough chromium in my diet. 🙂
    I notice that you listed green bananas on your list, do yellow bananas have chromium too? I usually have bananas at home for the kids.


    1. // Reply

      Dinh, isn’t it amazing that we get all we need in the foods we eat? We are special and highly blessed. Yes, I agree with you, based on the fact that we need just a little chromium and you and I are eating our fruits and vegetables, we should be ok with our chromium allowance for the day. The research speaks to bananas in general and so I am assuming that I am also getting chromium when I eat ripe bananas. If I see anything different, I will pass it on. All the best.


  4. // Reply

    I agree with you about eating whole foods for good health. I only eat real food that has not been processed. Processed foods have very little nutritional value as all the good stuff like chromium is removed. Thanks for another great post.


    1. // Reply

      Wendy, I am well on my way with real foods. Occasionally I have to fight “me demons” and resist a banana chips and maybe a piece of cheesecake, but that is blue moon. What a difference whole foods have made in my life. Let us continue to encourage others to eat whole foods. Cheers.

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